HMA 2016 {thank you}

On December 14, 2015, the Bonhams loaded up our suitcases and boarded a Mississippi-bound plane for our very first Home Ministry Assignment (HMA).

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^ Mississippi bound!

{In case you’re unfamiliar with the term,  HMA is a required part of our job as missionaries with MTW… As Long Term / Career missionaries, we return to the US for an extended period once per 4-year term to take care of our state-side missions responsibilities.  During this time, we visit our supporters and supporting churches in order to give missions reports and keep them up-to-date with ministry here on the ground.  We also work on fundraising to support our ministry here and recruiting new teammates, as well as take care of lots of administrative needs and medical issues before we return to the field to begin our next term.}

To be honest, I was really anxious about our HMA.  I was looking forward to seeing family and friends, and I always love opportunities to share about missions with churches and groups, but I still had a hard time getting on that plane.   We had finally gotten into a really good groove here in Peru, and I wasn’t ready to say goodbye to our routine and the community we had been starting to build.  We finally had some momentum both at home and in ministry, and I knew that a 134-day detour in the middle of that would be difficult.

Plus, since it would be our very first HMA, Nate and I weren’t really sure what to expect.  But I can definitely say that we were optimists and idealists rather than realists.  We had a long list of things we had planned to take care of and we were completely convinced we’d have no trouble checking them off.  After all, we had 134 whole days right?

Wrong.  It turns out that HMA was a little more complicated than we’d predicted, and our travel/speaking schedule, to-do list, and unexpected pile-up of medical issues took us by surprise.   By the time our April 26 departure date finally rolled around, we felt like we were barely limping onto the plane.

hma church collage
^ a small sampling of our stops along the way.

 

And while it was certainly an intense and exhausting stretch, it was also strangely energizing.  Maybe I can chalk it up to my verbal-processing tendencies, but standing in front of a group of people and sharing our passion for missions and ministry in Peru lights a fire under me.  There’s a part of me that genuinely loves the support-raising and reporting side of our job.  I love sharing my passions.   Every presentation and meeting filled me with a deep longing to get back to Arequipa.  Talking and reporting about ministry while having a little distance from the daily nitty-gritty only reconfirmed to my heart that this is exactly where we want to be.

 

Throughout all of the traveling and visits and presentations, I kept thinking back to an old blog post I wrote 4 years ago.  We were in the middle of support-raising for our initial departure to Colombia for training, and we were exhausted from the travel and schedule.  A lot of people asked me if it was worth it, or would comment that it was such a shame we had to do so much work to raise our money.    Back then, even though we were just in the very beginning steps of our missions journey, I could already see the start of something amazing.  I wrote,

Yes, it would be nice to have all of our monthly expenses magically covered by a big missions fund.  But it’s even nicer to have someone say to you, “I believe in what you’re doing.  I support the decision your family has made.  I want to literally invest my hard-earned money into the calling you’re so passionate about because I believe that God is building his kingdom through the spread of the Gospel.”

I look at our list of supporters and realize what they are.   Supporters.  They support us.  Financially.  Prayerfully.  Emotionally.   It’s a powerful thing.

Yes, I’m tired.    Yes, I’m sick of sitting in my minivan.   Yes, it’s hard work raising enough money to support us and our ministry.  But we’re not just raising support.  We’re raising supporters.  We’re raising prayer warriors.  We’re raising gospel partners.  In a few weeks, I’ll leave for Colombia  knowing I have a crowd of people back home supporting us.

So no, it’s not a shame.  It’s a blessing.

Every word of that still rings true, 4 years later.

We were thankful for the chance to spend time with family and friends.  We were so glad our boys had the chance to start building relationships with long-distance family members and experience a Mississippi Christmas.  We are so relieved to be able to take care of medical issues and surgeries in the US instead of Peru. All of those things were such wonderful blessings.

 

But most of all, I was thankful to get back on that Arequipa-bound plane on April 26, tired as we were, knowing that we were being supported by such an amazing crowd of family and friends who send us on our way with their love and encouragement and prayers and financial gifts.   They love us well from afar, and they are such a huge part in our ability to do our work well.   We are equipped and encouraged to go because they do such a great job of sending us.

So, thank you.  Thank you for sending us and serving us so well during our first term. Thanks for giving us the opportunities to share and tell stories about our lives here in Peru… for feeding us and loving us and entertaining our kids while we passed through your town and your congregation.  Thank you for signing on to another stretch of investment in the work going on here in Arequipa, for asking when you can visit and how you can pray.

But most of all, thanks for sending us back again.  We’re so thankful to be here.

*****

hma family collage

{I’m not going to do a full re-cap of all of our stops and visits and meetings and things, mostly because its hard to get all of that into one post.  But if you would like to see lots of pictures from HMA 2016, please feel free to scroll through my instagram account!

 

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